Warcoe – A Place for Demons

300

Heavier than The Giant’s DreamA Place for Demons shows Doom can be fun. Yes, A Place for Demons marches in the shadows of gloomy, towering riffs, but there’s an underlying and infectious charm in the music that’s simply irresistible. 

Warcoe - A Place For Demons Album Cover

Originally written for Monster Riff by PATRICK SCHOBER on February 9th, READ HERE

The Italian Doom aficionados of Warcoe describe their sound as “groovy doom from the abyss,” and, boy, they don’t disappoint. 

When they self-released The Giant’s Dream a couple of years ago, they immediately grabbed attention from music critics and record labels (more on that soon). 

Channeling all the most exciting bits of bands like Black Sabbath and The Obsessed, the Warcoe sound is built on a foundation of guitar heroics, hell-charred riffs, and Ozzy-inspired vocals. 

The Giant’s Dream was so good, it’s right up there with some of my favorite debuts of the last few years (alongside albums like Margarita Witch Cult). 

It’s a great record. 

But there’s a small problem: When you drop a killer debut, you give yourself a huge bar to clear on your follow-up. 

Fortunately, A Place for Demons doesn’t disappoint.

About Warcoe

Warcoe started in 2021 as an independent Doom Metal project. Although they self-released their first album, the strength of The Giant’s Dream helped them get signed by Helter Skelter Productions and Regain Records for a physical re-release.

A Place for Demons Album Review

Tracks: 8
Length: 39:32
Release Date: December 15, 2023
Label: Helter Skelter Productions

Track 1: A Place for Demons

The title track kicks off the album with a wicked opening riff that reaches beyond the typical Black Sabbath to channel something more Classic Metal. 

“A Place for Demons” is arguably the band’s most complex song to date, with each riff and drum beat lined up for maximum destruction. 

Track 2: Pyramid of Despair

“Pyramid of Despair” features a new sort of energy in the Warcoe discography. This is a high-energy rocker, sure, but it’s a gloomy one—as if this is the song we were meant to chant while stomping in line straight into hell. 

Track 3: Rune Dweller

Listeners of Warcoe’s debut might remember The Giant’s Dream featured an all-acoustic instrumental song called “Omega Sunrise” for track three. 

Same deal here: “Rune Dweller” is an all-acoustic instrumental track three. 

Tense, desperate, depressing—this isn’t so much an interlude as it is an emotional reset designed to drag you down before pummeling you with “Leaves.”

Track 4: Leaves 

The band switches up the instrumentation on “Leaves” for a new dramatic dynamic. While Warcoe typically pulls inspiration from the classic era of Black Sabbath, “Leaves” aligns better with the Dio years. 

Track 5: Ishkur

Brutal. Fuzzy. Loveable. “Ishkur” is all three at once. Easily the band’s heaviest and most energetic song to date, “Ishkur” stretches more than four minutes—but I didn’t want it to end on that first listen.

Track 6: Boys Become Kings

A cool, Doomy Rock ‘n’ Roller, “Boys Become Kings” falls somewhere between Black Sabbath and Electric Wizard—with a tiny serving of Proto-Metal. Stick around for the layered vocals, which are a welcomed addition to the record.

Track 7: Wounds Too Deep to Heal

With its electrifying guitar flourishes and high-energy Stoner Metal pacing, “Wounds Too Deep to Heal” has almost all of the necessary elements to become Warcoe’s breakout hit. While a different approach to the chorus could have helped that happen, “Wounds Too Deep to Heal” is still a terrific song.

Track 8: Buio 

“Buio” is Italian for darkgloomy, or dismal, and that’s exactly what this track is. Long, plodding, and Doom-laden, “Buio” is one continuous stomach punch delivering pummeling guitar chord after pummeling guitar chord. 

Final Thoughts On A Place for Demons

Final Score: 8/10

Standout Tracks: “A Place for Demons” and “Ishkur”

Pros: Heavier than The Giant’s DreamA Place for Demons shows Doom can be fun. Yes, A Place for Demons marches in the shadows of gloomy, towering riffs, but there’s an underlying and infectious charm in the music that’s simply irresistible. 

Cons: The only real drawback of this album is how it stands up to its predecessor, The Giant’s Dream. That first Warcoe record was a real gem, and it was a tough act to follow. Plus, as a Stoner Rock guy first and a Doom Metal fan second, I struggled with the merits of tracks like “Buio.” But that’s just me. 




Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *