Black Knife – Baby Eater Witch

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If you told me Black Knife was a band from the early 1980s metal scene I would absolutely believe you.  Nasty, grimy, greasy, raw, and at times primitive. Black Knife’s music contains many of those early metal music elements.  The production is raw, unvarnished, lots of saturation, and some mistakes.  I could be mistaken but if I were to guess, I don’t think there are any drum samples, time alignments, or autotune, just straight up fury.  This is not a criticism, it’s a declaration of happiness and a big thank you.  It seems obvious that Black Knife are a raw diamond that I look forward to watching transform into a juggernaut of pure crushing carnage.    

Artist: Black Knife

Album: Baby Eater Witch

Label: Wise Blood Records and Mercenary Press

Release Date: October 30th 2023

Location: Lexington, Kentucky

Written
by Thom Wells

If you told me Black Knife was a band from the early 1980s metal scene I would absolutely believe you.  Nasty, grimy, greasy, raw, and at times primitive.  Out of the early 80s underground metal scene, bands eventually were labeled Death, Black, Speed, and Crossover metal (to name a few).  Many of those early metal bands were not overly concerned with what genre their were, but were more focused in developing their sound from the dark recesses of nothing.  Eventually, many of these bands blossomed into well tuned war machines.  Think of the transformation Voivod went through from Warriors of Ice to Tribal Convictions. 

Black Knife’s music contains elements of Punk, Speed, British Invasion, and first wave Black metal.  Think Hellhammer, early Sodom, Possessed, and maybe a little Nasty Savage.  Back then bands were experimenting with new ideas, pushing the boundaries, and focused on creating fast pummeling music.  The thing I miss from that era was the raw nature of the music.  It was unpretentious, prone to mistakes and imperfections, and often was considered by outside music fans to be nothing more than noise.  Think of the music back then as raw carbons that eventually bonded into diamonds. 

Black Knife’s music contains many of those early metal music elements.  The production is raw, unvarnished, lots of saturation, and some mistakes.  I could be mistaken but if I were to guess, I don’t think there are any drum samples, time alignments, or autotune, just straight up fury.  This is not a criticism, it’s a declaration of happiness and a big thank you.  I am not trying to be overly critical of over polished music, but sometimes I want my music brutal, full of chaotic energy, and unapologetic.  Black Knife’s vocals at times have that cavernous reverb tank sound. The guitars are so grimy I almost feel they are using a fuzz pedal or some really nasty distortion pedal with all the settings on 10.  If you like your metal ugly and nasty this release will be right up your alley.

Most of the songs are less than 3:19 long.  The songs leap out at the listener, quickly get to the point, and then end before they over stay their welcome.  Memorable song titles include Evil Sex on Halloween, Snakebite Succubus, Heavy Metal Punk from Hell, and Screaming From the Depths of Hell. 

This is a fun record to put on, and I enjoyed it a lot.  It really reminds me of some of the early 80s tape trading day demos/records that I lost years ago.  If their live show captures a tenth of the energy of their recording, then be prepared for a brutal assault on the ears, and one hell of a damn good time.  I am so excited about that last few years of underground metal releases and this is another great record.  It seems obvious that Black Knife are a raw diamond that I look forward to watching transform into a juggernaut of pure crushing carnage.    

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